When Morons Do Moronic Things!

23:45pm Sunday evening.

portaledge

No quite El Cap

No explanation except boredom has taken its toll. When there’s really nothing else to do, why not get the portaledge up on the home wall?

On the up side, having a play about has really upped my psyche to start planning a trip to somewhere I can justify taking this beast…somewhere with slightly bigger walls than ours.

A Warm Up Run

“I’m bored.”

“Me too.”

“Want to head up the Cobbler and camp out?”

“Yeah, why not!”

That was pretty much as simple as it was last night when Euan had realised we both didn’t start work till 6p.m. the next day and couldn’t find anything to entertain himself. It was just after 10p.m. and we’d both just returned from a day in work. We’d seen that the conditions were good but both had work the following evening and so the idea to get out tonight and start climbing early tomorrow to make it back in time for work seemed more appealing than sitting in the flat bored out our minds, regardless of the time.

We packed our bags in minutes and headed up to Arrochar in the car. We arrived at The Cobbler car park only to realise that we both had notes rather than change in our wallets! The Cobblers car park usually goes by strict conduct of a pay and display meter, that comes with a hefty fine of £60 for being tight-fisted enough to not cough up the £1 fee for a 24 hour ticket. Having seen several people end up with fines from thinking they could get away with it in the past I refused to take the risk and so the hunt was on to find enough change in the car to afford a ticket.

“What we at?”

“23p”

“Damn!”

No luck, we’d pillaged the car and it just wasn’t going to stretch it. Several minutes and a few ‘Let’s just stick a fiver to the windscreen with an IOU’ ideas later, we decided we’d have to go to one of nearby hotels to change up our notes! We eventually managed to acquire a pound coin after I hassled the night guard of a local hotel to switch it for our fiver from the donation box labelled ‘Hand-Knitted Scottish Scarves’. I left the other £4 as a tip and dashed out the door…he must have thought I was mad! Finally we drove back to the car park and got our ticket. After all the commotion we finally got our packs on a left the car park just as the police turned up. Apparently it looks suspicious to be searching round a car park at 1a.m.

After taking our names and branding us mad men we were finally allowed to continue on our way (for the third time!). We started up the zigzags and before we knew it, past the dam, the hill running had obviously made a difference to our fitness as we both felt fresh even after keeping up a fast pace. We walked past the snow line for ten minutes or so before deciding to set up the tent, aware of the time after our late start and ‘delayed parking’. It was great to get the boots off. After having only worn them a few times since new, they were still being broken in

High exposure of headtorches in the tent. photo Euan Ryan

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The night passed quickly as the cold took no effect on us wrapped up well in our sleeping bags that have provided comfort in temperatures ten times colder in the past. Unfortunately the moment we crawled out of our bags into the cold there was no relief from a morning brew as we’d left the stove behind to save weight on the walk in. Only half a slice of Christmas cake and a single pain-au-chocolat each was all we had to kick-start us for the day ahead. We kitted up, hid the bags and tent under some boulders and snow and started the scramble up into the basin through the white out.

It wasn’t long until I noticed Euan wasn’t 100 percent. We’d only managed the first 100m of the steeper ground before he took a break to stretch his hip that had been giving him complaints on the walk-in the previous night. Having run his record time for a 10km only hours before we had left the flat, he obviously had strained something and the rise in gradient was enough to push it past a discomfort and into a progress stopper. It doesn’t take much for the two of us to know when something isn’t quite right with the other. Having climbed together for the last 10 years, we know when the other’s had enough and doesn’t want to say. Euan being his usual self continued on through the pain, obviously not wanting to hold us back and seeing my excitement for the first outing of the season, he probably didn’t want to ruin my day as well as his.

We chilled out at some nearby rocks and grabbed some water before discussing what the plan was. When we left the night before we thought we had been ingenious, managing to sneak our trip into the small amount of spare time that we had. Expecting to return to Glasgow with a smug look on our faces having managed a climb before our shift. This made it more of a shame that are first winter jaunt ended prematurely but with worse weather coming in and with Euan’s hip playing up, sometimes you need to know when you’re beaten. We called it a day and started back down the hill towards where we had stashed the bags. A slow and relaxed descent pace saw us at the car and on our way back to Glasgow before midday had struck, more time to rest up and grab some food before heading into work.

It might not have been the day we were expecting but I guess we can call it a ‘warm up run’ to the upcoming season.